GraphicsMagick

GraphicsMagick Image Processing System. GraphicsMagick is the swiss army knife of image processing. Comprised of 267K physical lines (according to David A. Wheeler’s SLOCCount) of source code in the base package (or 1,225K including 3rd party libraries) it provides a robust and efficient collection of tools and libraries which support reading, writing, and manipulating an image in over 88 major formats including important formats like DPX, GIF, JPEG, JPEG-2000, PNG, PDF, PNM, and TIFF. Image processing is multi-threaded (see the multi-thread benchmark results) using OpenMP so that CPU-bound tasks scale linearly as processor cores are added. OpenMP support requires compilation with GCC 4.2 (or later), or use of any C compiler supporting at least the OpenMP 2.0 specification. GraphicsMagick is quite portable, and compiles under almost every general purpose operating system that runs on 32-bit or 64-bit CPUs. GraphicsMagick is available for virtually any Unix or Unix-like system, including Linux. It also runs under Windows 2000 and later (Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8.X, 10), and MacOS-X. GraphicsMagick supports huge images and has been tested with gigapixel-size images. GraphicsMagick can create new images on the fly, making it suitable for building dynamic Web applications. GraphicsMagick may be used to resize, rotate, sharpen, color reduce, or add special effects to an image and save the result in the same or different image format. Image processing operations are available from the command line, as well as through C, C++, Lua, Perl, PHP, Python, Tcl, Ruby, Windows .NET, or Windows COM programming interfaces. With some modification, language extensions for ImageMagick may be used.


References in zbMATH (referenced in 3 articles )

Showing results 1 to 3 of 3.
Sorted by year (citations)

  1. Christophe Deroulers, David Ameisen, Mathilde Badoual, Chloe Gerin, Alexandre Granier, Marc Lartaud: Analyzing huge pathology images with open source software (2017) arXiv
  2. Chaniotis, Ioannis K.; Kyriakou, Kyriakos-Ioannis D.; Tselikas, Nikolaos D.: Is Node.js a viable option for building modern web applications? A performance evaluation study (2015) ioport
  3. Yihui Xie: animation: An R Package for Creating Animations and Demonstrating Statistical Methods (2013) not zbMATH